Lenine Peak

The Lenin Peak nicknamed "the Snow Leopard" is located in the Och province at the border of Tajikistan. Standing at 7,134 meters above sea level, this summit is considered one of the biggest mountains of the former Soviet Union, and attracts many mountaineers from around the world.

Some history

This solid mountainous mass remained uncharted for a long time. In 1928, three members of a German-Soviet expedition named Erwin Schneider, Eugene Allwein and Karl Wien decided to climb the peak. They became the first to ever tame the Lenin Peak. Its name comes from the famous Russian political theorist and statesman. It has been dubbed the highest peak of the Soviet Union. In 1933, it was stripped of this title by the Ismail Samani peak, which rises to an altitude of 7,495 m. In 1974, the massif attracts several climbers from all over the country. The same year, women climbers were killed by a violent storm while they were at a very high height. In 1990, an earthquake in Central Asia caused a great avalanche that hit camp 2. It led to 43 deaths, all of them were mountaineers. It was the most fatal accident recorded up to now on the Lenin Peak.

The Lenin peak today

The Lenin Peak attracts many climbers from the world around. Requiring no special techniques, the peak is often among the first big ascents for beginners. That may also be why it was the first mount of 7,000 m+ to be climbed in the world. Although this route has no major difficulties, it is still necessary to confront it with an excellent physical condition and suitable equipment. Many options are available to reach the top. Indeed, there are 16 navigable ways including 9 on the southern face and 7 in the north today. To achieve the massif ascent, horses are put at your disposal. The adventure begins once you arrive at the peak's foot. The rise of the Lenin Peak is a superb forwarding intended for those who want to challenge altitude. Forwarding constitutes outward journeys and returns on the mountain which remain relatively accessible and make it possible to benefit from an impregnable panorama on the surrounding mountains. Three basecamps were installed on the mountain for a few moments of well-deserved rest. The C1 camp is the easiest to join. The landscape is totally amazing from there. The climb until C2 is the only part which has got some cracks on the way but with good equipment, you will not have any difficulty to get there. Higher at 6.100 m, Camp 3 presents an impressive view on the dome of Radzelnaya. It is extremely cold, so plan to wear some warm clothing! Once you have arrived at C3, you can drop your bags and leave for a final effort onto the top. Chances are you’d be the only one attempting the cross of a large snowfield to 7,000 m before arriving there.

How to get there?

From Bishkek, take collective taxis to Osh. From Osh, there is a Marshruka for Tajikistan. It will drop you off at the collective taxi station in Sark Moghol.

Mountains
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